The Organizing Committee of ISBNPA 2020 Annual Meeting are pleased to offer you this wide selection of workshops.

Please note: ISBNPA workshop fees depend on your country’s classification by the World Bank. (see list here)

Workshop Registration Costs

Workshop TypeMember TypeLow
Income
Low
Middle
Income
Upper
Middle
Income
High
Income
Full DayFull Delegate$USD
80
$USD
90
$USD
100
$USD
110
Student$USD
50
$USD
60
$USD
70
$USD
80
Half DayFull Delegate$USD
53
$USD
60
$USD
66
$USD
73
Student$USD
33
$USD
40
$USD
47
$USD
53
Two Half DayFull Delegate$USD
106
$USD
120
$USD
132
$USD
146
Student$USD
66
$USD
80
$USD
94
$USD
106

The Organizing Committee of ISBNPA 2020 reserves the right to cancel any workshop should the minimum number of registrants not be reached. In the event of a workshop cancellation, the registrants will be notified via email and offered attendance at another workshop or a full refund.

Please Note

  • The registration cost for a half-day workshop includes morning or afternoon break and course notes
  • The registration cost for two half-day workshops includes morning and afternoon break and course notes
  • The registration cost for a full day workshop includes morning break, afternoon break and course notes
  • Courses will be in English only
Pre-Conference Workshop Schedule: Wednesday, June 17th
TimeHunua
#1
Hunua
#2
Hunua
#3
Waitakere
#1
Waitakere
#2
Waitakere
#3
Limelight
#1
Limelight
#2
Waihorotiu
#1
8:30
-
10:00
Workshop #1A Morning Session

Network of Early Career Researchers and Students of ISBNPA (NESI) Workshop
Workshop #2

An introduction to HABITUS - Human Activity Behavior Identification Tool and Data Unification System
Workshop #4

Network analysis
three approaches: Understanding how network analysis can be used to investigate relationships in public health research
Workshop #6

Midcareer Network workshop: Developing leadership in academia
Workshop #8

How to create videos that make your intervention more scalable, faithful, effective and cited
Workshop #9

Trial-based economic evaluation of physical activity interventions: Practical aspects of design, conduct and interpretation
Workshop #11

The ‘tug-of-war” between adaptation and fidelity in scale up of physical activity and healthy eating interventions
Workshop #13

Understanding simulation modelling as a research tool in behavioural nutrition and physical activity
Workshop #14

Methods in intervention development and evaluation
10:00
-
10:30

Coffee Break
10:30
-
12:00
Workshop #1A Morning Session

Network of Early Career Researchers and Students of ISBNPA (NESI) Workshop
Workshop #2

An introduction to HABITUS - Human Activity Behavior Identification Tool and Data Unification System
Workshop #4

Network analysis
three approaches: Understanding how network analysis can be used to investigate relationships in public health research
Workshop #6

Midcareer Network workshop: Developing leadership in academia
Workshop #8

How to create videos that make your intervention more scalable, faithful, effective and cited
Workshop #9

Trial-based economic evaluation of physical activity interventions: Practical aspects of design, conduct and interpretation
Workshop #11

The ‘tug-of-war” between adaptation and fidelity in scale up of physical activity and healthy eating interventions
Workshop #13

Understanding simulation modelling as a research tool in behavioural nutrition and physical activity
Workshop #14

Methods in intervention development and evaluation
LUNCH ON YOUR OWN
(12:00-13:15)
Hunua
1#
Hunua
#2
Hunua
#3
Waitakere
#1
Waitakere
#2
Waitakere
#3
Limelight
#1
Limelight
#2
Waihorotiu
#1
13:15
-
14:30
Workshop #1B Afternoon Session

Network of Early Career Researchers and Students of ISBNPA (NESI) Workshop
Workshop #3

Identifying the
‘best buys’ in public
policy for promotion
of physical activity
and healthy nutrition: Can we do it? If yes, how? why? and what can we learn from each other
Workshop #5

Moving evidence
based nutrition and physical activity interventions into the
real world: Application
of dissemination and implementation science
Workshop #7

Co-design of organisational policy
and public policy action to support health-enabling retail stores
Workshop #8

How to create videos that make your intervention more scalable, faithful, effective and cited
Workshop #10

Want to make your science impactful? Seek synergy. Be non-traditional
Workshop #12

Application of advanced technology in physical activity and health promotion
Workshop #13

Understanding simulation modelling as a research tool in behavioural nutrition and physical activity
Workshop #14

Methods in intervention development and evaluation
14:30
-
15:00

Coffee Break
15:00
-
16:30
Workshop #1B Afternoon Session

Network of Early Career Researchers and Students of ISBNPA (NESI) Workshop
Workshop #3

Identifying the
‘best buys’ in public
policy for promotion
of physical activity
and healthy nutrition: Can we do it? If yes, how? why? and what can we learn from each other.
Workshop #5

Moving evidence
based nutrition and physical activity interventions into the
real world: Application
of dissemination and implementation science
Workshop #7

Co-design of organisational policy
and public policy action to support health-enabling retail stores
Workshop #8

How to create videos that make your intervention more scalable, faithful, effective and cited
Workshop #10

Want to make your science impactful? Seek synergy. Be non-traditional
Workshop #12

Application of advanced technology in physical activity and health promotion
Workshop #13

Understanding simulation modelling as a research tool in behavioural nutrition and physical activity
Workshop #14

Methods in intervention development and evaluation

Full Day Workshops

Time: 08:30-16:30

Title: How to create videos that make your intervention more scalable, faithful, effective and cited

Room: WAITAKERE #2

Name of the Proponent: Dr Michael Noetel

Affiliation: Australian Catholic University

Other Persons Involved: 

Brief Description: Video is everywhere and it’s effective. For example, YouTube is the world’s second biggest search engine and the third most visited website. People enjoy watching video, and it’s one of the best ways of teaching and engaging an audience. Our team has used video to recruit participants and partners, deliver faithful, scalable interventions, and increase our citations through video abstracts. But, professional video production might feel out of reach for many physical activity and nutrition researchers. This workshop will show that it’s not: professional video production can be easy and affordable, even for us academics. This workshop will walk you through all the steps from scripting, production, filming, editing, and multimedia design. It will be a hands-on workshop that’s a productive use of your time: by the end of the day, you’ll have a well-produced video abstract for one of your recent or upcoming papers. In the process, you’ll learn how to craft a message that sticks, how to shoot a video that doesn’t make you look and sound like you’re in witness protection, and how to edit multimedia that educates and engages your audience.

 

Time: 8:30-16:30

Title: Understanding simulation modelling as a research tool in behavioural nutrition and physical activity

Room: LIMELIGHT #2

Name of the Proponent: Anja Mizdrak

Affiliation: University of Otago (Wellington), New Zealand

Other Persons Involved:

Dr Amanda Jones, amanda.jones@otago.ac.nz, University of Otago (Wellington), New Zealand
Dr Leopold Aminde, l.aminde@griffith.edu.au, Griffith University, Australia
Dr Linda Cobiac, linda.cobiac@ndph.ox.ac.uk, University of Oxford, UK
Dr Ruth Hunter, ruth.hunter@qub.ac.uk, Queens’ University Belfast, Ireland

Brief Description: This workshop will cover the basics of different simulation modelling techniques for behavioural nutrition and physical activity research. In recent years there has been appreciable growth in the number of studies using simulation modelling methods in behavioural nutrition and physical activity. If you are a researcher who is curious about modelling and trying to make sense of modelling studies, or someone who might like to incorporate modelling into your research, this interactive workshop is for you. This workshop will equip you with the tools to understand different modelling approaches, familiarise you with terminology and methodology, and provide you with an understanding of the process of modelling a public health intervention. The workshop will cover some of the most common modelling approaches including comparative risk assessment, multi-state life table modelling, and agent-based approaches. This is an introductory workshop – no previous experience necessary.

Time: 8:30-16:30

Title: Methods in intervention development and evaluation

Room: WAIHOROTIU#1

Name of the Proponent: Audrey Buelo

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

Other Persons Involved:

Professor Ruth Jepson (Ruth.Jepson@ed.ac.uk), University of Edinburgh
Dr. Divya Sivaramakrishnan (Divya.Sivaramakrishnan@ed.ac.uk), University of Edinburgh
Dr. John McAteer (john.mcateer77@gmail.com), University of Edinburgh
Jillian Manner (Jillian.Manner@ed.ac.uk), University of Edinburgh

Brief Description: This 1-day workshop will use the Six Steps in Quality Intervention Development (6SQuID) framework to teach the principles of intervention development and evaluation using a step-by-step approach, drawing on practical examples to illustrate each step of the process. Course participants will learn how to develop complex interventions to increase effectiveness, acceptability and implementation of interventions. This course will be aimed at developing the necessary skills, as well as learning novel methods of intervention development and evaluation, giving insights into some of the most important considerations when designing and evaluating complex interventions, specifically within the realm of physical activity and dietary interventions. Attendees will develop their understanding of intervention development and evaluation through expert lectures, group discussions and group tasks. By the end of this course, learners should understand:

1) The main steps involved in complex intervention development;
2) How a systematic and thoughtful approach to the development of interventions can lead to more robust evaluations;
3) The range of approaches to evaluation of complex interventions including realist evaluation and natural experiments;
4) How to decide which evaluation approach is most appropriate for the intervention.

Half Day – Morning Workshops

Time: 8:30 – 12:00 – Session 1A
         13:15 – 16:30 – Session 1B
(Please note that this workshop needs to be booked as morning and afternoon separately)

Title: Network of Early Career Researchers and Students of ISBNPA (NESI) workshop

Room: HUNUA #1

Name of the Proponent: Dr. Jenna Hollis

Affiliation: 

1. Chair webinar/workshop team, Network for Early career researchers and Students of ISBNPA (NESI), ISBNPA
2. Hunter New England Population Health and the University of Newcastle, Australia

Other Persons Involved:

1. Maartje Poelman (Universiteit Utrecht; M.P.Poelman@uu.nl) and Katherine Downing (Deakin University;k.downing@deakin.edu.au) – ISBNPA Executive Committee ECR and student representatives
2. NESI committee members (15 members)

Brief Description:

The workshop is for ECRs and students who are interested in their career development. The workshop is structured in two half day sessions providing participants with the option to register for either a half-day session or the full day.

The workshop will focus on:

  • Session #1A: Developing research skills, including grant writing, research dissemination, building collaborations and networking, and career planning. The workshop format will include presentations from experts, breakout activities, and small group networking sessions with the presenters and other ECR and student participants.
  • Session #1B: Career pathways post Ph.D. (e.g. academia, government and non-government organizations, and related industry), including personal career stories from other early- and mid-career researchers. The workshop format will include presentations, panel discussions, a small group breakout activity, and short career stories.

All participants will have the opportunity to network with senior researchers and ECRs in the field of behavioral nutrition and physical activity.

 

Time: 8:30-12:00

Title: An introduction to HABITUS – Human Activity Behavior Identification Tool and Data Unification System

Room: HUNUA #2

Name of the Proponent: Jasper Schipperijn

Affiliation: University of Southern Denmark

Other Persons Involved:

Tom Stewart, Auckland University of Technology, email: tom.stewart@aut.ac.nz

Brief Description:

Determining the context in which physical activity or sedentary behavior occurs is important for both monitoring and intervention evaluation purposes. Collecting contextual information using global positioning systems (GPS) and combining it with accelerometer data can provide high-quality context-specific measures. However, merging and processing combined accelerometer and GPS data can be challenging. To help researchers with this task we have developed a new system, HABITUS – the Human Activity Behavior Identification Tool and Data Unification System.
HABITUS consists of three separate elements: secure data storage, a user interface with processing algorithms; and data processing on a High-Performance Computer (HPC).

HABITUS incorporates several open source GPS and accelerometer processing tools, including the GGIR R package to work with raw accelerometer data. The development of algorithms available on HABITUS will be open source community projects where many people can contribute. All algorithms will be made available open source to aid research transparency and reproducibility.

During this workshop we will introduce and demonstrate HABITUS, and participants will be provided with login instructions and user guides. We will also explain how users can help further develop the system.

Time: 8:30-12:00

Title: Network analysis three approaches: understanding how network analysis can be used to investigate relationships in public health research.

Room: HUNUA #3

Name of the Proponent: Dr. Katherine Cullerton

Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of Queensland, Australia.

Other Persons Involved:

Dr. Megan Ferguson, School of public Health, University of Queensland, Australia. megan.ferguson@uq.edu.au
Prof Shona Hilton, MRC/CSO Social & Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, UK. Shona.Hilton@glasgow.ac.uk

Brief Description: Network analysis is the study of relationships. Increasingly it has been applied as a method to develop theory about relationships and coalitions in public health policy debates. In particular, there has been a focus on relationships between: stakeholders with vested interests in health policy debates; organisations in policy submissions; stakeholder roles and avenues to influence organisational policy; and citations and author relationships. The purpose of this half-day interactive workshop is to introduce participants to network analysis concepts, share three different case studies that used network analysis, and explore approaches and the tools available for network analysis. Participants will develop their own network dataset and be introduced to free, online network analysis software which they will use to analyse the dataset they create in the workshop. Upon completing this workshop, participants will have an understanding of the basic concepts and methods of network analysis and how this can be applied to their own public health case. Participants will need to bring a laptop with NodeXL (a free program) installed prior to the workshop, to participate.

Time: 8:30-12:00

Title: Midcareer Network workshop: developing leadership in academia

Room: WAITAKERE #1

Name of the Proponent: Borja del Pozo Cruz

Affiliation: Australian Catholic University

Other Persons Involved:

Hoekstra, Trynke, trynke.hoekstra@vu.nl; EMGO (Institute for Health and Care Research, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) 

Brief Description: Please join us for the Leadership and Midcareer Network (MCN) workshop at the 2020 ISBNPA Annual Meeting. The MCN is the most recent community within the ISBNPA membership and includes researchers and practitioners who self-select themselves to be at Midcareer. Transitioning from being a good researcher to being in a leadership position is complex, particularly at the Midcareer level. Within MCN, we strive to build specialized support in soft and hard skills that allow our people during such transition, from leading the writing of your first major grant to effectively manage your research group to success. In this half-day workshop, we aim to will have participatory sessions with midcareer and senior researchers from the field of physical activity and nutrition who will provide you with insights into core topics essential to develop yourself as leader in the field. During the workshop you will for example be supported to review your repertoire of capabilities and qualities, identify leadership strengths and growing edges and gain insight in practices to build your academic leadership capabilities and qualities.

Time: 8:30-12:00

Title: Trial-based economic evaluation of physical activity interventions: practical aspects of design, conduct and interpretation

Room: WAITAKERE #3

Name of the Proponent: Marina B. Pinheiro

Affiliation: Institute for Musculoskeletal Health, University of Sydney

Other Persons Involved:

Nicola Fairhall; nicola.fairhall@sydney.edu.au; Institute for Musculoskeletal Health, University of Sydney
Cathie Sherrington; cathie.sherrington@sydney.edu.au; Institute for Musculoskeletal Health

Brief Description: In light of limited resources, economic evaluation provides a framework for comparing the relative value of different interventions and can be used by decision makers to allocate resources efficiently to maximise population health outcomes. Therefore, establishing the cost-effectiveness of health interventions is essential if interventions are to generate real world policy and practice impact.

The aim of this workshop is to provide an overview and practical tips on how to plan, conduct and interpret results from trial-based economic evaluations of physical activity interventions. Using our two trial-based economic evaluations as case studies, we will cover the key components of designing a trial-based economic evaluation, including identification, measurement and valuation of health outcomes and resource utilisation. We will also give practical tips on how to interpret results from published economic evaluations of physical activity interventions. Participants will be encouraged to ask questions and share their experiences.

This workshop is tailored for researchers who are planning a new trial and would like to investigate the value for money of the intervention as well as those who want to develop skills to understand and interpret results from published trial-based physical activity economic evaluations.

Time: 8:30-12:00

Title: The ‘tug-of-war” between adaptation and fidelity in scale up of physical activity and healthy eating interventions.

Room: LIMELIGHT #1

Name of the Proponent: Dr. Heather McKay

Affiliation: University of British Columbia

Other Persons Involved:

Dr. Patti-Jean Naylor, University of Victoria, Canada; pjnaylor@uvic.ca
Dr. Luke Wolfenden, University of Newcastle, Australia; luke.wolfenden@newcastle.edu.au
Dr. Erica Lau, University of British Columbia, Canada; erica.lau@ubc.ca
Dr. Elaine Toomey; Health Behaviour Change Research Group/Cochrane Ireland; National University of Ireland Galway; elaine.toomey@nuigalway.ie
Dr. Adrian Bauman, University of Sydney, Australia; adrian.bauman@sydney.edu.au

Brief Description: Most research studies are designed to evaluate efficacy in a small, select sample of participants. However, to achieve population health benefits, evidence-based interventions must be scaled-up. During scale up, it is often necessary to adapt implementation strategies and the intervention itself to achieve ‘best fit’ for specific settings and populations. This may cause tension between researchers who seek to retain fidelity to the evidence-based intervention and the need to adapt, based on the needs and capacity of community partners or other stakeholders.

The goal of this interactive, half-day workshop is to provide a roadmap for researchers who seek to adapt evidence-based interventions in preparation for scale up. We will introduce frameworks to guide adaptation, the process of adaptation and approaches to evaluate adaptation. We will illustrate using real-world examples from presenters and workshop participants.

Our specific objectives are threefold:

1. To explore a) what has been called a ‘tug of war’ between fidelity and adaptation, and b) ‘essential components/functions’ of an intervention.
2. To introduce conceptual frameworks that can be used to guide the adaptation process.
3. To discuss the process and evaluation of adaptation (at various stakeholder levels and in different populations).

Half Day – Afternoon Workshops

Time: 8:30 – 12:00 – Session 1A
         13:15 – 16:30 – Session 1B
(Please note that this workshop needs to be booked as morning and afternoon separately)

Title: Network of Early Career Researchers and Students of ISBNPA (NESI) workshop

Room: HUNUA #1

Name of the Proponent: Dr. Jenna Hollis

Affiliation: 

1. Chair webinar/workshop team, Network for Early career researchers and Students of ISBNPA (NESI), ISBNPA
2. Hunter New England Population Health and the University of Newcastle, Australia

Other Persons Involved:

1. Maartje Poelman (Universiteit Utrecht; M.P.Poelman@uu.nl) and Katherine Downing (Deakin University;k.downing@deakin.edu.au) – ISBNPA Executive Committee ECR and student representatives
2. NESI committee members (15 members)

Brief Description:

The workshop is for ECRs and students who are interested in their career development. The workshop is structured in two half day sessions providing participants with the option to register for either a half-day session or the full day.

The workshop will focus on:

  • Session #1A: Developing research skills, including grant writing, research dissemination, building collaborations and networking, and career planning. The workshop format will include presentations from experts, breakout activities, and small group networking sessions with the presenters and other ECR and student participants.
  • Session #1B: Career pathways post Ph.D. (e.g. academia, government and non-government organizations, and related industry), including personal career stories from other early- and mid-career researchers. The workshop format will include presentations, panel discussions, a small group breakout activity, and short career stories.

All participants will have the opportunity to network with senior researchers and ECRs in the field of behavioral nutrition and physical activity.

 

Time: 13:15-16:30

Title: Identifying the ‘best buys’ in public policy for promotion of physical activity and healthy nutrition: Can we do it? If yes, how? why? and what can we learn from each other.

Room: HUNUA #2

Name of the Proponent: Catherine Woods

Affiliation: University of Limerick

Other Persons Involved:

Dr. Janas Harrington (Co Chair); j.harrington@ucc.ie; University College Cork. Ireland.
Prof. Adrian Bauman; adrian.bauman@sydney.edu.au; Sydney University. Australia.
Prof. Boyd Swinburn; boyd.swinburn@auckland.ac.nz. The University of Auckland. New Zealand.
Dr. Peter Gelius; peter.gelius@fau.de; Friedrich-Alexander University. Germany. EU.
Ms. Fiona Sing; f.sing@wcrf.org; World Cancer Research Foundation, United Kingdom. EU.
Prof. Elizabeth Ablah; eablah@kumc.edu; University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, USA.
Prof. Rebecca Lee; releephd@yahoo.com. Arizona State University, USA.

Brief Description: Urban cities host over half the world’s population and their growth is projected to increase in the foreseeable future. Within these urbanised food and physical activity (PA) systems, promoting health enhancing behaviours and sustainability is challenging. Indeed, the UN Sustainable Development Goals blueprint highlights the need to ‘make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable’. A need to move beyond the individual behaviour change to broader policy or systems-based approaches is needed. For Governments, the concept of a ‘best buy’ in public health interventions is associated with evidence of effectiveness, rationale for need and applicability to the target population. Yet, in public sector policy the concept of a ‘best buy’ is far from clear. Indeed, the ‘best buy’ indicators (from a scientific perspective) may not be politically relevant (due to context) and/or difficult to obtain. The aim of this workshop is to share the learnings from global studies focused on examining public policy development, implementation and evaluation in food and PA. This workshop will explore the tensions that exist in identifying policy ‘best buys’, the impact of different stakeholder perspectives’ on agreeing ‘best buys’, and the associated issues of monitoring for accountability at city and national levels.

Time: 13:15-16:30

Title: Moving evidence based nutrition and physical activity interventions into the real world: application of dissemination and implementation science

Room: HUNUA #3

Name of the Proponent: Dr. Nicole Nathan

Affiliation: Hunter New England Population Health and The University of Newcastle

Other Persons Involved:

Professor Paul Estabrooks, paul.estabrooks@unmc.edu, University of Nebraska Medical Center
Dr. April Oh, april.oh@nih.gov, U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Dr. Rachel Sutherland, Rachel.Sutherland@health.nsw.gov.au, The University of Newcastle Australia

Brief Description: As researchers we are increasingly being asked to demonstrate the impact that our research has made in the community. However, getting efficacious nutrition and or physical activity interventions implemented at a population level is often difficult. Dissemination and implementation science is the study of methods and strategies to promote the uptake and enactment of evidence-based interventions in routine practice. This workshop will provide participants with the foundations to develop implementation strategies that will increase the likelihood of evidence-based intervention adoption and implementation in clinical and community practice. Through the use of a case study approach, participants will work in small groups to gain an applied understanding of implementation science. By the end of the workshop participants will, using a theory-based approach, be able to:

1. Identify explanatory frameworks that detail the mechanisms by which adoption and implementation occur.
2. Identify and operationalize mechanism and outcome metrics such as practitioner capacity, organisational readiness for implementation of evidence based practices, and implementation fidelity.
3. Define and identify implementation strategies to address mechanisms of dissemination and implementation across various intervention contexts.

Time: 13:15-16:30

Title: Co-design of organisational policy and public policy action to support health-enabling retail stores

Room: WAITAKERE #1

Name of the Proponent:Dr. Megan Ferguson

Affiliation: The University of Queensland

Other Persons Involved:

Dr. Emma McMahon, emma.mcmahon@menzies.edu.au, Menzies School of Health Research
A/Prof Julie Brimblecombe, julie.brimblecombe@monash.edu, Monash University

Brief Description: Evidence is rapidly emerging regarding how retail food environments can be optimised to support healthier food choice and improve health. Retailers are increasingly interested in adopting health-promoting merchandising techniques into their organisations’ policies. To increase the likelihood that these will be successful and sustainable, policies must be effective (i.e. informed by best available evidence), feasible (i.e. for business sustainability and practical) and acceptable (i.e. to consumers and retailers). Implementation of health-promoting organisational policy can be enabled or impeded by the public policy environment.
This half-day interactive workshop will explore tools and processes for building health-promoting organisational policy, such as disincentivising high-sugar foods through merchandising, and public policy, such as conditions within lease agreements, in food retail stores, with case studies drawing from our experiences with remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community stores. Participants will obtain first-hand experience in an approach of working with retailers and stakeholders to: i) develop a series of best-practice organisational policies; and ii) define public policy instruments and advocacy plans that best support organisation policy. Participants will be positioned to work with food retailers or other relevant stakeholders to co-design sustainable, health-promoting organisational policy and collectively advocate for public policy instruments that support these efforts.

Time: 13:15-16:30

Title: Want to make your science impactful? Seek synergy. Be non-traditional.

Room: WAITAKERE #3

Name of the Proponent: Anjali Rameshbabu, Ph.D.

Affiliation: Oregon Healthy Workforce Center

Other Persons Involved: 

Brief Description: Chronic diseases continue to be the leading cause of mortality, disability, and high healthcare costs worldwide. The large volume of health behavior change interventions developed each year to tackle those diseases will take about 15-20 years to get to practice. How can we accelerate this research-to-reality process?

This workshop will lead participants on a journey to discover the reasons for the obstinate and cavernous divide between science and action, explore the role of professionals across pertinent fields like Health Psychology, Public Health & Policy, Dissemination & Implementation Science, Business & Innovation, and Systems Science, and explore strategic avenues for addressing this gap.

Intended to engage attendees, specifically early, mid-career, and senior professionals across academia, practice, and policy, this highly interactive workshop aims to (a) invite diverse perspectives and experiences from experts around the world, (b) facilitate creative, practical, and sustainable action plans and (c) potentially galvanize a coalition of professionals and fields interested in meaningfully collaborating toward curbing the rising trend of chronic disease by making science more impactful.

Above all, this workshop is a call to action to reach beyond our silos, seek synergistic connections, and step into non-traditional paths to find the gaps and fill in the blanks between great science, sound policy, and well-being.

Time: 13:15-16:30

Title: Application of Advanced Technology in Physical Activity and Health Promotion

Room: LIMELIGHT #1

Name of the Proponent: Zan Gao, PhD, Director of Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology, The University of Minnesota at Twin Cities

Other Persons Involved:

Jung Eun Lee PhD, junelee@d.umn.edu; The University of Minnesota at Duluth
Daniel J. McDonough, mcdo0785@umn.edu; The University of Minnesota at Twin Cities
Wenxi Liu, liux4443@umn.edu; The University of Minnesota at Twin Cities

Brief Description: As technology becomes an ever more prevalent part of everyday life and population-based physical activity programs seek new ways to increase life¬long engagement with physical activity, so the two have become increasingly linked. This workshop attempts to offer a thorough, critical examination of emerging technolo¬gies in physical activity and health promotion, considering technological interventions in different contexts, exploring the challenges of integ¬rating technology into physical activity promotion and offering solutions for its implementation.
This workshop will occupy a broadly positive stance toward interactive technology initiatives and, while discussing some negative implications of an increased use of technology, offers practical recommendations for promoting physical activity through various emerging technologies, including: active video games (exergaming); social media; mobile device apps; health wearables; augmented reality games; and virtual reality settings. Offering a logical and clear critique of emerging technologies in physical activity and health promotion, this workshop will provide hands-on experience and practical implications for researchers, practitioners, and students in the fields of public health, kinesiology, physical activity and health, and healthcare.

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